Le discours complet de Barack Obama à la Convention démocrate – VIDÉO

Discours de Barack Obama pendant la convention démocrate de Charlotte, en Caroline du Nord, le 6 septembre 2012. REUTERS/Jim Young

Discours de Barack Obama pendant la convention démocrate de Charlotte, en Caroline du Nord, le 6 septembre 2012. REUTERS/Jim Young

Pour la dernière soirée de la convention démocrate, qui s'est tenue à Charlotte, en Caroline du Nord, du 4 au 6 septembre, John Kerry et Joe Biden se sont exprimés avant, bien sûr, Barack Obama.

Le président des Etats-Unis a prononcé un discours d'investiture de 38 minutes (10 minutes de moins que Bill Clinton la veille):

Barack Obama s'est présenté en homme changé par son mandat, et avait comme message principal l'idée que, le 6 novembre prochain, c'est un choix entre deux visions radicalement différentes pour l'avenir qui s'offrait aux Américains, pas juste un choix entre deux candidats ou deux partis.

Pour nos lecteurs qui veulent le lire dans le texte, voici le discours de Barack Obama tel qu'il a été distribué à la presse:

Michelle, I love you. The other night, I think the entire country saw just how lucky I am. Malia and Sasha, you make me so proud…but don’t get any ideas, you’re still going to class tomorrow. And Joe Biden, thank you for being the best Vice President I could ever hope for.
Madam Chairwoman, delegates, I accept your nomination for President of the United States.
The first time I addressed this convention in 2004, I was a younger man; a Senate candidate from Illinois who spoke about hope – not blind optimism or wishful thinking, but hope in the face of difficulty; hope in the face of uncertainty; that dogged faith in the future which has pushed this nation forward, even when the odds are great; even when the road is long.
Eight years later, that hope has been tested – by the cost of war; by one of the worst economic crises in history; and by political gridlock that’s left us wondering whether it’s still possible to tackle the challenges of our time.
I know that campaigns can seem small, and even silly. Trivial things become big distractions. Serious issues become sound bites. And the truth gets buried under an avalanche of money and advertising. If you’re sick of hearing me approve this message, believe me – so am I.
But when all is said and done – when you pick up that ballot to vote – you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. Over the next few years, big decisions will be made in Washington, on jobs and the economy; taxes and deficits; energy and education; war and peace – decisions that will have a huge impact on our lives and our children’s lives for decades to come.
On every issue, the choice you face won’t be just between two candidates or two parties.
It will be a choice between two different paths for America.
A choice between two fundamentally different visions for the future.

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